Since You’ve Been Gone

After a couple weeks on the new job, he goes out on a Saturday morning and stops by the recycling center to visit one of his former clients, who talks to him like he’d never left, tells him about the med changes, tells him that he’s still hoping to join the gym, still hoping to visit his brother in New Jersey, even though the brother has never returned his calls, even though no one’s helping him make plans for the trip or hire a traveling companion.

He starts to tell his former client all about his new job, but the client doesn’t seem to acknowledge that he’s been gone for a while now, and even asks him when he’s coming by for his next home visit or if he’ll be seeing him at the Drop-In Center on Wednesday before Men’s Group. 

Later, after coffee, alone, he thinks about dropping in on another former client at his home, but recognizes his own pathetic dependency, decides instead to let the past be past and drives home slowly, noticing the increasingly overcast sky and the first of the changing leaves.  

4 thoughts on “Since You’ve Been Gone

  1. Makes us think. To realize that our own problems are more in our mind than any problems or news of the person we are talking with. Makes us realize how we all need people to listen to us. Good job, Ron.

  2. Letting go is tough. I worried about my students when I left teaching, but over time the kids became fuzzy memories. A lot like recalling the hot summer days when icy winds are blowing off the river!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s